Mynd.Works - Anxiety Treatment Canberra

Visualisation trumps Anxiety!

Exposure Therapy, aaaargh…

The most dreaded part of any phobic’s treatment and the technique I most often hear being used by traditional psychology. It’s the time when you have to actually face whatever has been scaring you, which initially causes even more anxiety, and panic attacks.

But, wait… just for a moment. Are you doing everything you can to make exposure therapy quick, easy and relatively painless?

Could visualization help?

My answer, and the answer from thousands of my own clients worldwide is a resounding “YES”.

Some people aren’t afraid of anything and go through life little-to-no anxiety. They shrug off bad news and appear to thrive in stressful situations. As the saying goes, they are ‘as tough as old boots’.

Over the last few decades experts have devoted many hours to understanding why some people are more optimistic, fearless, and hardy than others.

There are a few obvious reasons like upbringing, possibly some genetics, diet, and brain structure which play a role, but none of those things condemn you to a life of uncontrollable anxiety, fear and hopelessness. So what do the successful people do differently?

They imagine things differently – they visualise.

For years people have done visualization exercises for the purpose of relaxation, the standard one being to visualize yourself on a beach feeling the warmth on your skin. As relaxation techniques they are very effective for most people, resulting in a lowering of blood pressure and pulse rate, and helping relieve muscle tension. Most people report feeling calmer.

This is great for general anxiety, stress and worry but only of limited help when it comes to tackling specific anxiety or phobias. Relaxation is good and obviously it’s better to tackle a specific issue with a relaxed body than with a tense one, but state of mind is very important and the trigger of the phobic situation, be it entering an airport, seeing the elevator doors close, nearing the front of a queue or hearing the subway train approaching, can bring all of that relaxation crashing down.

So what can be done to make a different kind of visualization work for you?

Let’s examine one of my favourite options.

When it comes to tackling a specific issue, sun-kissed beaches are probably irrelevant on their own. Instead of leading your mind into relaxing in an imaginary situation why not combine that relaxation with imagining the real issue.

After getting yourself into the most relaxed, calm and comfortable physical state possible, you can then lock-in that great relaxed feeling by using an anchor technique – nipping a finger and thumb together or taking 3 deep breaths.

Then, while physically relaxed, actually shift your thoughts into having yourself doing whatever it is you have a phobia of, or whatever situation makes you feel anxious… but this time you’re having yourself do it in a calm, physically relaxed and perhaps even a happy fashion as if it were a “normal” occurence.

Let’s say your anxiety is triggered by travelling in an elevator, why not visualize yourself leaving your house, arriving at a tall building, calmly walking over to the elevator, pressing the button to summon it.

Waiting for the doors to open, stepping in and watching the doors close, all the time activating your good feelings by taking those deep breaths or nipping that finger and thumb together. Then imagine stepping out at your destination floor.

The following steps can make the visualization work more powerfully.

1, Visualising in the “first person”, seeing the situation from your own eyes, don’t see yourself doing it as if you were an actor on a movie screen. Your mind will see it as someone else, not as you.

2, Use all of your senses. Think about everything that you might see, hear, feel and smell and recreate them in your mind. Think also of things that are not important to the situation but which you might hear anyway, people talking in the background, mobile phones ringing etc. Also do this with sights, smells and textures.

3, If you find visualization hard persevere, it takes time and patience to undo what your mind has constructed, but rest assured, results will come.

4, If you find it impossible to visualize being calm and happy in the phobic situation then break down the visualization into parts. Spend some days becoming calm looking at the elevator from the outside, take as long as you need. Build up to riding in the elevator as slowly as you want. Eventually you will get to be calm and happy in the situation you used to fear.

5, When it feels right, and you’ve practiced visualising for a week or so, go for it in real life!

In fact, here’s what I’m going to do…

Seeing as though it’s NEW YEAR…

I’ll guide you through the actual ‘anxiety reduction technique’ for free if you visit here.

And if you like it, there’s an option to purchase it to listen while offline for some minimal amount (I think it’s about $6).

What are you waiting for?

Let me know how it goes.

3 Quick Ways to Release your Anxiety

Feeling anxious and not sure how to deal with it?

Everyone experiences Anxiety from time to time. Sometimes, it involves both physical and mental symptoms that create even more stress.

Here are 3 quick tips that can give you immediate relief:

FOCUS

When you’re anxious, your mind isn’t focused on NOW. It’s racing back into the past or into the future – to things that haven’t even happened yet.

The instant you realise that you are thinking negative thoughts, intentionally bring your focus back into the present – after all, that’s all that ever exists – this moment. Returning to full the awareness of NOW is really liberating because it allows you to realise that you can choose to control the focus of your thoughts.

So how do you practise mindfulness during anxious moments?

Start by controlling your breathing. Then look down on your body. Notice your clothes, your feet, and the comfort level you are experiencing at the moment. Notice any tension you feel at any part of your body. And slowly, release the tension and allow that part of you to soften.

Lastly, look around you. Notice all the details of your surroundings. When your mind starts to wander again, bring it back to the present. Don’t feel bad. It’s normal.

Here are some more tips on relaxing while anxious.

Laugh a little more

When anxiety-provoking moments strike, having an extra dose of laughter can be really helpful. Laughter is one simple and free tool that alleviates symptoms of anxiety and lifts your mood. When you laugh, the ‘happy hormones’ in your brain activate which gives you positive feelings.

It could be difficult to insert some laughter when you are already stressed out. So just like mindfulness, you want to intentionally make yourself feel better. Rest for a while. Watch a funny video or a comedy film. Chat with an amusing friend. Laughter is a great medicine.

put the past back in the past

Don’t let the past control you. If you hold grudges, you’re holding onto a poisonous feeling, so practice letting go and moving on. It may be a challenge but once you realise that even your worst nightmare was a massive opportunity for growth you instantly change the situation into a powerful lesson.

Healing takes time, letting go allows you to move forward with your own life, without harbouring all that negative energy you’re carrying.

Dealing with anxiety can be challenging, but give these techniques a try. Who knows – one, if not all, may ultimately free you from the unbearable world of anxiety.

If you need help with your anxiety, send me an email or book an absolutely FREE consultation so I can give you more specific advice.

Follow me on instagram for more anxiety release tips and tricks.

motivation, blog, hypnosis, myndworks

8 Steps to Unbreakable Motivation

Whether you’re heading towards a specific goal, trying to stick to your New Year’s resolutions or just pumping yourself up towards something in the future, motivation is the thing that makes or breaks success in the first instance – hands down.

Motivation is actually made up of two parts. First there is the drive to get started on the thing you wish to achieve, and the second is the willpower to keep at it.

The most long-lasting motivation is created internally. When you rely on external factors you surrender control of your progress. But when you motivate yourself, you remain in the driving seat and it’s this that will often lead to more enjoyment and a stronger sense of achievement.

Here are some steps to help you get motivated and maintain it…

  1. Review

Think of your main goal or what you’d like to be motivated about and then ask yourself

  • What would happen if I achieved that?
  • What wouldn’t happen if I achieved that?
  • What would happen if I didn’t achieve that?
  • What wouldn’t happen if I didn’t achieve that?

This will give you a clear idea of what will happen when you do or don’t achieve that what you’re after. These answers are your motivations.

Take those motivations and paste them everywhere. Keep the list with you in your wallet or purse, on a flash card, stick them to your computer screen, your phone screensaver or anywhere else that you regularly look at and therefore be reminded of them.

  1. Reflect

Take time to sit and think. Self-hypnosis, meditation, guided visualisation – whatever floats your boat, just DO IT! Bring your wandering mind and its thoughts back to this moment NOW. What is happening RIGHT NOW is all there ever is. All that ever exists. And it’s in this moment NOW that you can begin to focus on a plan. You can consciously recharge whenever you are feeling drained. One of the most motivating things you can do is to rest and renew yourself at regular intervals.

  1. Listen to yourself

We can be very critical of ourselves sometimes but we can also be our own greatest cheerleaders. Focus your mind towards the positives in your motivations list and believe that anything that cannot be controlled by you is alright. Tell yourself, “it’s fine”, and keep going.

  1. Move it

Exercise will not only keep you energised, refreshed, and motivated, it also gives you an active time to reflect on things.

Examining your thoughts while you exercise can double your productivity. If a challenge springs to mind you can push a little harder and use that energy to fuel an even better workout. A long walk or gentle run can become very introspective and the release of feel-good chemicals in the brain can reduce stress and enhance motivation as a natural by-product.

Exercise your mind as well by doing things differently. Try brushing your teeth with the other hand, swapping knife and fork around or even taking a new route to work. In this way, you’re developing a growth mindset and training your mind to enjoy new challenges. This can be applied to the major goals you wish to achieve. Sometimes having a new insight or approach to life can excite and motivate.

  1. Accountability

Find at least one (or more) like-minded people who can support and motivate you through the good and bad times. These people will share your triumphs and failures, be genuinely happy and, most importantly, be there for you. Feeling alone or having the wrong people around you can destroy your motivation.

  1. Listen to music

Listen to your favourite, uplifting music. Create a play-list that has all the music you love listening to that makes you feel motivated, inspired and high-spirited. Play that soundtrack first thing in the morning and at regular intervals in your day to give yourself a good lift and a strong shot of motivation. Feel free to dance around and release those feel-good hormones.

  1. The big picture

Imagine your life after you’ve achieved your goal. Allow yourself to really step into the vision. When you have a clearly-defined image, you will be more motivated to pursue the big picture. Revisit your vision regularly and allow it lift you.

  1. Celebrate the journey

Huge goals often take time to realise. This can be frustrating and become a drain on the original motivation. So, on your journey towards success, pay attention to and celebrate how far you’ve come! Remember the challenges you’ve accomplished so far and be proud of yourself. The celebration will inspire you and build a more effective you.

You may even prefer to set a series of short-term goals and celebrate reaching those on your way towards your main objective.

Ultimately, motivation starts with mindset and if you use one or more of the tried and tested techniques outlined above, you’ll find yourself at the finish line quicker than you could ever have imagined.

If you’d like to learn how hypnotherapy can help you get motivated, get in contact with Richard for a free rapid change consultation.

Richard Scott combines psychology, NLP and CBT with over 10 years’ professional, full-time experience in traditional and modern hypnosis to deliver the fastest, most successful results. He specialises in stress and anxiety control, weight management, confidence and self-esteem, and empowering women.